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GSL-130

Minefield breaching vehicle

GSL-130 minefield breaching vehicle

The GSL-130 was designed to create passages through minefields

 
 
Country of origin China
Entered service 1980s (?)
Crew 2
Dimensions and weight
Weight 35 ~ 40 t
Length ~ 7 m
Width ~ 3.5 m
Height ~ 3.7 m
Performance
Firing range 100 m
Passage through minefield 100 m long by 4-5 m wide
Armament
Machine guns -
Mobility
Engine 12150L diesel
Engine power 520 hp
Maximum road speed 47 km/h
Range 400 km
Maneuverability
Gradient 60%
Side slope 30%
Vertical step ~ 0.8 m
Trench ~ 2.85 m
Fording 1 m

 

   The GSL-130 is a Chinese minefield breaching vehicle. It is based on a Type 59 medium tank chassis. Industrial designation of this engineer vehicle is WZ763. The GSL-130 was adopted by the China's military, including China's army and marines. This minefield breaching vehicle saw service with Chinese forces serving with the UN in Lebanon in 1987. The GSL-130 was deployed by UN units in Lebanon yet again in 2007. The GSL-130 was exported to Sudan and possibly some other countries.

   This armored vehicle was specially designed to clear pathways through minefields. It creates safe lanes for troops and vehicles to pass through minefields. This allows assault units to move rapidly through minefields, before enemy forces establish defenses. It is used by engineer battalions.

   The GSL-130 is based on the Type 59 medium tank chassis. Surplus Type 59 tanks were refurbished and converted to minefield breaching vehicles. The turret has been removed and replaced by an armored superstructure. Specialized equipment was added.

   There is a wide mine plough mounted at the front. Also there are launchers for mine clearing line charges, mounted at the rear of the superstructure. Mine clearing line charges are essentially rockets carrying explosives up to 100 m forward. These are launched from a large superstructure. These charges detonate mines, bombs or improvised explosive devices at a safe distance. Demining charges create a passage in the minefield with a length of 100 m and a width of 4-5 m. In this way the GSL-130 makes safety lanes in the minefields to pass for the troops and vehicles. Also the GSL-130 has a cleared lane marking system, installed at the rear. It deploys pennants into the ground as the machine moves forward.

   This armored vehicle is operated by a crew of 2. It takes around 15 minutes to prepare the vehicle for minefield breaching.

   Protection level of this machine should be similar to that of the Type 59 medium tank. This armored engineer vehicle carries no defensive armament.

   The GSL-130 is powered by a 12150L V12 diesel engine, developing 520 hp.

   The GSL-133 is another Chinese minefield breaching vehicle. It is based on the Type 96 main battle tanks. This machine has revised layout and minefield breaching equipment. It is in service since around 2018, or possibly earlier.

 

 

 
GSL-130 minefield breaching vehicle

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GSL-130 minefield breaching vehicle

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GSL-130 minefield breaching vehicle

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GSL-130 minefield breaching vehicle

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GSL-130 minefield breaching vehicle

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