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Alvis Stalwart

Amphibious cargo vehicle

Alvis Stalwart

The Alvis Stalwart amphibious cargo carrier was intended to supply forward units

 
 
Entered service 1966
Configuration 6x6
Cab seating 1 + 2 men
Dimensions and weight
Weight (curb) 9 t
Maximum load 5 t
Length 6.36 m
Width 2.62 m
Height 2.31 m
Mobility
Engine Rolls-Royce B-81 Mk.8B petrol
Engine power 220 hp
Maximum road speed 65 km/h
Amphibious speed on water ~ 11 km/h
Range 820 km
Maneuverability
Gradient 60%
Side slope 40%
Vertical step ~ 0.6 m
Trench 1.5 m
Fording Amphibious

 

   The Stalwart amphibious cargo vehicle was developed by Alvis as a private venture. It entered service with the British Army in 1966. Its British Army designation is the FV620. In service it was nicknamed the 'Stolly'. The main function of the Stalwart was to supply forward units with fuel and ammunition. This military vehicle is not armored.

   This amphibious cargo vehicle has a payload capacity of 5 000 kg. In the troop carrier configuration it could carry 30 fully equipped soldiers. It could also tow trailers or artillery pieces with a maximum weight of 10 t. Cargo area of the Stalwart has large drop-down panels with waterproof seals on either side and a drop-tailgate. The cargo area could be covered with a canvas cover.

   Cab of this amphibious vehicle provides seating for the driver, plus two passengers. The driver is seated in the middle. The cab is entered through the roof hatches.

   The Stalwart is based on the Saracen 6x6 armored personnel carrier chassis. A number of automotive components are interchangeable. The Stalwart is powered by Rolls-Royce B-81 Mk.8B petrol engine, developing 220 hp. Vehicle has a full-time all-wheel drive. It has an impressive cross-country mobility. The Alvis Stalwart is fully amphibious with minimal preparation. On water this cargo vehicle is propelled by two waterjets. Maximum amphibious speed on water was about 11 km/h. It is worth mentioning that waterjet units of the Stalwart were complex and troublesome to maintain. It was common to remove them when amphibious qualities were unnecessary, to simplify maintenance.

   Production of the Alvis Stalwart ended long time ago. It was also withdrawn from the British Army service. Its amphibious transport role was taken over by utility helicopters. Many of these amphibious carriers were sold to modern-day enthusiasts. Many were converted to amphibious tour vehicles.

 

Variants

 

   Stalwart Mk.2 General Service (FV622). It could carry up to 38 fully-equipped troops. It could carry a field refueling pack, instead of the cargo. The Stalwart Mk.2 was fitted with improved waterjets. Its maximum speed on water was about 16 km/h;

   Stalwart Mk.2 Limber (FV623). Artillery re-supply vehicle, fitted with a hydraulic crane in the cargo area;

   Engineering vehicle, based on the Mk.2. It was also fitted with a crane.

 

Video of the Alvis Stalwart amphibious cargo vehicle

 

 
Alvis Stalwart

Alvis Stalwart

Alvis Stalwart

Alvis Stalwart

Alvis Stalwart

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