Home > Tanks > Drozd

Drozd

Active protection system

Drozd active protection system

The Drozd protection system improved survivability of the tanks against anti-tank rockets and missiles

 
 
Country of origin Soviet Union
Entered service 1983
Specifications
Number of launchers 8
Operating method Radar-guided

 

   The 1030M Drozd (trush) was a Soviet active protection system. This type of weapons is also known as hard-kill protection systems. It was designed to provide additional protection for tanks against incoming anti-tank rockets and missiles.

   Since the mid 1960s Soviets began development of active protection systems in order to improve protection of their tanks. Mass production of the Drozd protection system commenced in 1982.

   The first tank to use this system was a T-55AD. It was the first tank in the world to be fitted with such kind of protection system. It was adopted in 1983.

   The Drozd active protection system had a radar. It detected incoming threats at a range of over 150 m from the vehicle and triggered special 107 mm High Explosive Fragmentation (HE-FRAG) munitions. This 107 mm munition operated in a broadly similar manner as a buckshot. Missiles and rockets were destroyed at a range of 6.6 m form the tank. Even if incoming rocket or missile was not destroyed, a blast could set it off course. The Drozd could intercept rockets and missiles traveling at a maximum speed of up to 700 m/s.

   A total of 8 launchers with these special defensive munitions were mounted on the outer edges of the turret. The system operated automatically without the input from the tank crew. The Drozd system covered the front arc of the tank well, however it could not provide a 360 degree coverage. Also this system was not effective against top attack anti-tank weapons or anti-tank munitions launched from buildings and rooftops. Soviets considered that the Drozd system has a 70% probability of hit ratio against incoming anti-tank missiles and rockets. However the Drozd had no effect against kinetic energy munitions, such as armor-piercing sabot rounds.

   This system had a brief reaction time and could protect the tank against multiple incoming threats. The second defensive munition could be launched in 0.35 s after the first one.

   Major drawback of this system is that it had a kill zone of at least 25 meters in front of the tank. If activated defensive munitions are dangerous to supporting infantry in front of the tank. When the system was activated, a special light turned on. It warned the infantry to keep away from the tank.

   The whole system added 1 000 kg to the tank weight. External Drozd components on the tank, including the launchers, were protected from 12.7 mm heavy machine gun fire and artillery shell splinters.

   However only a total of 258 of the T-55AD tanks were built. Production of the Drozd system ceased in around 1988. At the time Soviets signed an arms reduction treaty, which involved the T-55AD tanks.

   In the early 1990s, after collapse of  the Soviet Union, most of these tanks (some sources mention around 250 units) ended up in Ukraine. Most of these were eventually scrapped. Some Drozd systems were removed and refitted on the Ukrainian T-80UD, T-84 and Oplot tanks.

   In 1993 Russians successfully tested the Drozd system on lightly armored vehicles. It turned out that this active protection system could be also used to protect lightly armored vehicles. In 1998 a Drozd system was mounted on some Russia's T-80 main battle tanks.

   A single T-55AD tank with Drozd active protection system was transferred from Ukraine to the United States for trials and examination.

   Eventually the Drozd paved the way for a number of other active protection systems. In the 1980s and 1990s Russians were ahead of the world in terms of active protection system technology. Other countries had no equivalent systems for their main battle tanks. However eventually other countries caught up and introduced various active protection systems. Many of them outperformed the Russian ones.

   Recently Russians developed a new Afganit active protection system for their Armata main battle tank. In concept this protection system is similar to the Drozd.

 

Variants

 

   T2A2, or Drozd-1 was an improved version of the Drozd, specially designed for the T-62 tanks. Its development began in 1984. It successfully passed initial trials in 1989. However due to funding problems development of this system was stopped and it was never adopted.

   Drozd 2 was an improved version of the Drozd. It can intercept missiles and rockets traveling at a maximum speed of 1 200 m/s. It intercepts targets at a range of 7-10 m from the vehicle. This system had modular design and could be mounted on various tanks, armored vehicles and even stationary assets. Once mounted on the tank it offers a claimed 80-90% of hit probability against incoming anti-tank missiles and rockets.

 

 

 

 
Drozd active protection system

Expand image

Drozd active protection system

Expand image

Drozd active protection system

Expand image

Drozd active protection system

Expand image

Drozd active protection system

Expand image

Drozd active protection system

Expand image

 

Personal appeal from Andrius Genys
Please Read

Top 10 Tanks
Top 10 Main Battle Tanks

Top 10 Armored Personnel Carriers
Top 10 Armored Personnel Carriers

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Home  Home     Aircraft     Helicopters     Tanks     Armored Vehicles     Artillery     Trucks     Engineering Vehicles     Missiles     Naval Forces     Firearms     |     Contact Us
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARG 2006 - 2021
www.Military-Today.com