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Hobart class

Anti-air warfare destroyer

Hobart class

The main role of the Hobart class is to provide long-range air defense for expeditionary forces

 
 
Country of origin Australia
Entered service 2017
Crew 202 men
Sea endurance ?
Dimensions and displacement
Length 147.2 m
Beam 18.6 m
Draught 5.17 m
Displacement, standard ?
Displacement, full load 6 890 tons
Propulsion and speed
Speed 28 knots
Range 9 300 km at 18 knots
Propulsion CODOG propulsion. 2 x gas turbines (47 000 shp) and 2 x diesel engines (15 160 shp), driving two shafts
Airwing
Helicopters 1 x MH-60R Seahawk
Armament
Artillery 1 x 127 mm gun, 1 x 20 mm Phalanx CIWS, 2 x 25 mm cannons
Missiles 48-cell VLS with RIM-66 Standard 2 and RIM-162 ESSM air defense missiles, 8 x Harpoon anti-ship missiles
Torpedoes 2 x twin 324 mm torpedo launchers for MU90 torpedoes

 

   The Australian Hobart class of anti-air warfare destroyers was designed in Spain by Navantia. It is based on the Spanish Alvaro de Bazan class frigate. Though the Hobart class warships are larger. Three ships are planned by the Royal Australian Navy. These are being constructed in Australia. The lead ship, HMAS Hobart, was commissioned in 2017. The second vessel, HMAS Brisbane followed in 2018. These new warships will replace the older Adelaide class frigates.

   The main role of the Hobart class is to escort expeditionary naval force and provide long-range air defense and anti-missile protection. Secondary tasks are anti-surface and anti-submarine warfare.

   The Hobart class destroyers are technologically advanced. These warships are fitted with Lockheed Martin SPY-1D(V) Aegis radar. The Aegis is a world class air defense combat system. It is in service with the US Navy. It is also present on Spain's Alvaro de Bazan class frigates, Japan's Atago class and Kongo class destroyers, and South Korea's Sejong the Great class destroyers.

   The Aegis radar can detect air targets at a range of over 300 km. It can track hundreds of targets simultaneously. The system controls the detection and engagement of hostile threats. Hobart class destroyers are also fitted with secure tactical data system for communication with other naval assets. Most likely that Hobart class warships are linked to the US Aegis ballistic defense system.

   The Hobart class is fitted with a 48-cell Mk.14 Vertical Launch System (VLS). It is armed with a combination of RIM-66 Standard 2 long-range surface-to-air missiles and RIM-162 Evolved Sea Sparrow (ESSM) point defense missiles.

   The ships are also fitted with Harpoon anti-ship missiles. There are two 4-canister launchers. The Harpoon has a range of 120 km, a 220 kg warhead and and active radar and thermal guidance. Additionally, the Hobart class is fitted with a 127 mm Mk.45 gun for shore and anti-ship bombardment. It has a maximum range of 23.6 km. The gun has a radar/electro-optic fire control system.

   Anti-submarine capabilities are provided via two twin Mk.32 324 mm torpedo launchers for Eurotorp MU90 torpedoes. Submarine detection is provided by an integrated active and passive sonar system.

   For close-in defense the ships carry a single aft-facing 20 mm Phalanx Close-In Weapon System (CIWS), plus two 25 mm M242 Bushmaster cannons in Typhoon mounts.

   The Hobart class warships can accommodate a single MH-60R Seahawk naval helicopter. Its primary missions are anti-submarine warfare and anti-surface warfare. Secondary tasks are surveillance, communication relay, combat search and rescue, naval gunfire support and logistic missions.

   Ship's countermeasures suite includes decoy launchers. It is likely that the ships are also fitted with an acoustic torpedo countermeasures system.

   These destroyers have a Combined Diesel or Gas (CODOG) propulsion. It is slightly more powerful than than of the Alvaro de Bazan. Machinery includes two General Electric LM 2500 gas turbines, developing a combined output of 47 000 shp, and two Caterpillar diesel engines, developing a combined output of 15 160 shp. Powerplants are mounted on anti-vibration mounts to reduce noise. The Hobart class ships have a top speed of 28 knots (52 km/h). Standard range is 5 000 nautical miles (9 260 km) at 18 knots (33 km/h). Australian warships have a longer range than their Spanish predecessors, as the endurance was important for Australian operating conditions.

   The Hobart class is operated by a crew of 202 men, including aircrew. It can accommodate a total of 234 sailors.

 

Name Laid down Launched Commissioned Status
Hobart (39) 2009 2015 2017

active, in service

Brisbane (41) 2014 2016 2018

active, in service

Sydney (42) 2015 2018 expected in 2019-2020

sea trials

 

 

 
Hobart class

Hobart class

Hobart class

Hobart class

Hobart class


 
Hobart class

Hobart class

 

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