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Hatsuyuki class

Guided-missile destroyer

Hatsuyki class destroyers

The Hatsuyuki class destroyers are optimized for the anti-ship and anti-submarine roles

 
 
Entered service 1982
Crew 195 - 200 men
Sea endurance ?
Dimensions and displacement
Length 130 m
Beam 13.6 m
Draught 4.2 m
Displacement, standard 2 950 - 3 050 tons
Displacement, full load 3 700 - 3 800 tons
Propulsion and speed
Speed 30 knots
Range 12 975 km at 20 knots
Gas turbines 2 x Rolls-Royce Olympus TM3B, (2 x 49 000 shp), 2 x Rolls-Royce Tyne RM1C (2 x 9 900 shp)
Aircraft
Helicopters 1 x SH-60J Seahawk
Armament
Artillery 1 x 76-mm OTO Melara Compact gun, 2 x Mk.15 20-mm Phalanx close-in weapon systems
Missiles 2 x quadruple Harpoon launchers, one Mk.29 Sea Sparrow  surface-to-air missile launcher, one Mk.112 octuple ASROC ASW torpedo launcher
Torpedoes 2 x tripple Type 68 324-mm tubes for Mk.46 Mod 5 anti-submarine torpedoes

 

   This 12-strong class of destroyers was authorized at the end of the 1970s for the Japanese navy, or Japanese Maritime Self-Defence Force as it has styled itself since being re-established in the 1950s. The gas turbine-powered Hatsuyuki class was created as a multi-purpose design incorporating a balanced anti-air, anti-ship and anti-submarine sensor and armament fit. The first seven ships were built with weight-saving aluminium alloy for their bridge structures and other upperworks, but later vessels used steel which led to a slight increase in displacement. The name-ship was laid down in march 1979, launched in November 1980 and commissioned in May 1982; the last of the class was laid down in 1984 and commissioned in 1987. In 1992 the Shirayuki (DD 123) became the first to be fitted with the 20-mm Phalanx CIWS (Close-in Weapons System): this short-ranged but fast-reacting anti-missile system was progressively fitted to the rest of the class during the 1990s. Other improvements include the Canadian Beartrap helicopter landing system and state-of-the-art electronic counter measure equipment to the last three ships of the class. The Shimayuki (DD 133) was converted to a training ship (TV 35) in 1999 and now has a lecture theatre added to the helicopter hangar.

   The Hatsuyuki class are capable all-round warships fitted with fin stabilisers. Their primary anti-ship armament is the Harpoon missile which has a range of some 130 km: flying just above the sea, it delivers a 227-kg warhead at a speed of Mach 0.9. To attack submarines, the ships carry the widely used ASROC system that can drop a Mk 46 homing torpedo up to 9 km from the ship. The Hatsuyuki class ships do not carry a long-range anti-aircraft weapon, built as they were to engage surface and sub-surface threats under vocer of the US or Japanese air forces. Their Sea Sparrow surface-to-air missiles have a range of 15 km, while the CIWS is purely a point-defense system intended primarily for the engagement and destruction of anti-ship missiles.

   In the near future all Hatsuyuki class ships will be replaced with the Takanami class vessels.

 

 
Hatsuyuki class destroyer

Hatsuyuki class destroyer

Hatsuyuki class destroyer

Hatsuyuki class destroyer

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