Home > Naval Forces > Albion class

Albion class

Landing platform dock

Albion class LPD

Currently two Albion class landing platform docks are in service with Royal Navy

 
 
Entered service 2003
Crew 325 men
Sea endurance ?
Dimensions and displacement
Length 176 m
Beam 29.9 m
Draught 6.7 m
Displacement, standard 19 560 tons
Displacement, full load 21 500 tons
Propulsion and speed
Speed 20 knots
Range 14 825 km at 14 knots
Diesel generators 2 x 6.25 MW and 2 x 1.56 MW
Electric motors 2 x ?
Cargo
Troops (normal) 305 men
Troops (overload) 710 men
Vehicles 6 x main battle tanks or 30 APCs
Cargo ?
Landing craft
Landing craft 4 x LCU and 4 x LCVP
Aircraft
Helicopters 2 - 3 medium helicopters
Armament
Artillery 2 x 30-mm Goalkeeper CIWS mountings and 2 x 20-mm anti-aircraft guns

 

   The Royal Navy's two assault ships, HMS Fearless and HMS Intrepid, laid down in 1962, were due for deletion in 1981 as part of the Conservative government's decision to end the Royal Marines amphibious capability. This ruling played a major role in the Argentine decision of the following year to invade the Falklands Islands. The two ships were reprieved and played a vital role in the liberation of the islands. It was another 10 years before a decision was taken to authorise replacements for what were, by the 1991 Gulf War, very elderly ships. Even then, the two Albion class LPDs were not laid down until 1998 and 2000 respectively, by which time the Intrepid had been cannibalised to keep the Fearless operational. Even then, the fire in the ship's engine room during November 2000 as the Fearless was operating off Sierra Leone, riven by civil war, demonstrated the dangers in relying on a 40-year old ship. Keeping it in service was estimated to require another 2 million, so the Fearless was paid off in March 2002.

   The 429 million replacement programme was accelerated after the events of 11 September 2001, and the requirement was altered to demand the capability for the mounting of more than one amphibious operation at a time. HMS Albion was launched in March 2001, but its in-service date of March 2002 slipped by a year. HMS Bulwark was launched in November 2001, but workers on it were transferred to accelerate the completion of the Albion.

   Much larger and more capable LPDs than the ships they are replacing, the Albion class units are part of a wider modernisation of the British amphibious capability. They will serve alongside the HMS Ocean helicopter carrier and the four Bay class landing ships (logistic) planned to replace the Sir Bedivere class LSLs. The extensive command and control systems aboard the Albion class represent a great leap forward for the Royal Navy and Marines.

   One feature worthy of note is the diesel-electric propulsion system, the first to be used by a British surface warship. This requires only two-thirds the engineering complement of the older LPDs and, in overall terms, automation and new technology have reduced the manning requirement from 550 to 325. The four new LCU Mk 10 ro-ro landing craft operated by each Albion are capable of carrying a Challenger 2 main battle tank.

 

 
Albion class LPD

Albion class LPD

Albion class LPD

Albion class LPD

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Home  Home     Aircraft     Helicopters     Tanks     Armored Vehicles     Artillery     Trucks     Engineering Vehicles     Missiles     Naval Forces     Firearms     |     Contact Us
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARG 2006 - 2017
 www.Military-Today.com Albion class