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Korsar

Anti-tank guided missile

Korsar (corsar) ATGW

The Korsar is a light and portable anti-tank guided weapon

 
 
Country of origin Ukraine
Entered service ?
Armor penetration 550 mm
Range 2.5 km / 2.55 km
Missile length (in container) 1 160 mm
Missile diameter 107 mm
Fin span 2.5 kg
Missile weight 13.5 kg
Missile weight with launcher 18 kg
Warhead weight ?
Warhead type Tandem HEAT
Guidance Laser-guided

 

   The RK-3 Korsar (Corsar) is the smallest infantry Anti-Tank Guided Missile (ATGM) ever developed in Ukraine. It is roughly comparable to the Soviet 9K115 Metis. Examining its appearance and characteristics reveals its construction and performance combines aspects of legacy Eastern Bloc systems and so-called “fourth-generation” ATGMs.

   The Korsar’s origins date to the early 2000s as a project by Ukraine’s state-owned defense contractor Luch and a prototype was debuted during the 2005 IDEX arms show in Abu Dhabi. At the time the Korsar was a lightweight shoulder-launched ATGM similar in function to the French Eryx—an armed missile launch tube attached to a guidance unit.

   The Korsar fires a 107 mm missile with a tandem HEAT warhead at ranges from 50 to 2 500 meters. It’s meant to defeat armored vehicles and fortifications such as bunkers and hardened structures. The warhead’s penetration is good enough against most APCs and IFVs as well as tanks. This missile penetrates 550 mm of Rolled Homogenous Armor (RHA). Whether it can knock out an M1A2 Abrams or a Leopard 2A6 is unclear; the Korsar’s marketing focuses on its portability and ease-of-use.

   To enhance the firepower of the infantry who’ll be using the Korsar, Luch developed a 107 mm thermobaric or high explosive rocket propelled grenade munition that’s effective within 600 meters. This feature is meant to function like the Matador rocket launcher or the Carl Gustaf recoilless rifle as a bunker buster although it can destroy vehicles as well.

   In recent years Luch modified the Korsar into a portable system with separate components. It now has a launch tube, a guidance unit with eight times magnification, and a collapsible tripod mount.

   When assembled the improved Korsar looks like a copy of the Israeli Spike-LR though both systems are incompatible. Given the difficulties facing Ukraine’s economy at the moment the Korsar has yet to find its niche in the ATGM market.

   But with demand for affordable modern anti-tank weapons set to grow in the coming years the Korsar still has a chance to make a splash. Given its finer attributes it represents the potential of Ukrainian innovation in optoelectronics, material science, and missile technology.

 

Variants

 

   Pirat is a Polish version of the Korsar.

 

Miguel Miranda

   Article by MIGUEL MIRANDA

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Korsar (corsar) ATGW

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Korsar (corsar) ATGW

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Korsar (corsar) ATGW

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Korsar (corsar) ATGW

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Korsar (corsar) ATGW

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