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Fateh-110

Tactical and short-range ballistic missile

Fateh-110 ballistic missile

In 2020 Iranian Fateh 110 series missiles were used to engage US airbases in Iraq

 
 
Country of origin Iran
Entered service 2002
Crew ?
Missile
Missile length 9 m
Missile diameter 0.61 m
Fin span ?
Missile weight 3 700 kg
Warhead weight 450 kg
Warhead type Conventional
Range of fire ~ 250 km
CEP 250 m

 

   The Fateh-110 (Conqueror-110) is an Iranian tactical ballistic missile. It has been developed in two different generations. Currently, the first generation of the Fateh-110 missile family is one of the most produced and accurate tactical ballistic missiles in Iran. The Fateh-110 series missiles have a range of 250-500 kilometers and can hit targets with an accuracy of about 5-10 meters. These missiles travel at a maximum speed of Mach 3-5 (3700-6170 km/h). The Fateh-110 missile was first tested in 2000. Various versions of the missile are currently operational with capabilities such as targeting warships, radars and small ground targets.

   In 1985, the Iran-Iraq War entered a new phase called the "War of the Cities". In order to stop Iran's advance on the front lines, Iraq started targeting urban centers. For months dozens of large rockets and missiles were fired at Iranian cities, without any response. At the time there there were no missiles in Iranian arsenal.

   In the final years of the war, Iran was pursuing the production of new artillery rockets, one of which was a rocket called Zelzal (Earthquake). Zelzal was a solid-fuel rocket with a maximum range of 125 km and a 600 kg warhead. The rocket had an accuracy of about 500 meters in its maximum range. The powerful warhead and poor accuracy led to a plan to develop a missile based on it.

   11 years later, a ballistic missile was launched based on the Zelzal-2 rocket. The Fateh-110, a tactical ballistic missile with the same range as the rocket, but much more accurate. The first version of Fateh-110 had about 250 km range, could carry a 500 kg warhead. This 9-meter missile was tested in 2001. It had four fins near the top to correct the path, weighed more than 3 tons and it was the first solid-fuel ballistic missile in Iran. Now, this initial version is known as Fateh-110A.

   At the same time, liquid-fuel missiles with longer range, such as Qadr, were developed for distant threats. The solid-fuel missile development program continued with upgrading the Fateh-110 missile. Soon enough, the second and third versions of Fateh-110 (the Fateh-110B and -C) were operational with a maximum range of 300 km and an accuracy of 100 meters and 10 meters, respectively. The Fateh-110B was unveiled in 2004 and the Fateh-110C was announced in 2010.

   As the goal of the ever-increasing development of the Fateh-110 was to counter new US threats in the Middle East, and the US Navy was a potential threat to Iran, more accurate missiles were designed to face the US naval vessels in the Persian Gulf. The first version was a missile called Khalij-e Fars (Persian Gulf). It was adopted by the Iranian military in 2008. The Khalij-e Fars had exactly the same specifications as the improved Fateh-110. It had a range of 300 km and a warhead of around 500 kg. The difference was that the Khalij-e Fars missile had much more advanced guidance system. It was equipped with an electro-optical system to attack the ships so that it could track and lock on them in the final phase of the attack. Thanks to this electro-optical system, the CEP of this version was reduced to 5-8 meters.

   A few years later, a second anti-ship version of the Fateh-110 family was unveiled. The Hormuz  missile was named in a reference to the Strait of Hormuz. It was adopted in 2012. Unlike the Khalij-e Fars, it uses a passive radar seeker to intercept ships. The system is mounted on the top of the missile which tracks and locks on the radar waves emitted, thereby hitting the radar on the ship (which is usually located on the ship command bridge). Considering this, it can be said that Hormuz is in fact the anti-radar version of the Fateh-110 missile and can be used against any type of shipborne or land-based radars.

   Another missile of this family, the Fateh-110D entered service in 2012. This missile was designed for land attack.

   All first-generation missiles in the Fateh-110 family have two types of mobile launchers. One of the types is based on Mercedes-Benz or IVECO commercial truck chassis and has a single launch rail. Once in launch position, these vehicles with missiles are usually covered with multi-spectrum camouflage.

   The second type of launcher is based on 6x6 military chassis. Similar chassis are used by air defense systems such as the Tabas or Sevom Khordad. This type of launcher carries two missiles. It can also carry a combination of two missiles. For example, two different versions, such as the Khalij-e Fars and Hormuz, side by side.

   Although the launcher vehicles can carry missiles in traveling order on their launch rails, there is also a type of road carrier for missiles which is completely covered. This carrier has a form of a road trailer with a container and escorts the launcher vehicles. The Fateh-110 series missile are commonly carried inside this container to their launch position.

   Currently, Iran and Syria are the only official operators of the Fateh-110 series missiles. Syrian missiles are based on 8x8 truck chassis. According to various sources (including Israeli ones), Hezbollah formations in Lebanon also operate these missiles. Though it is not clear which version or how many they have, but any version of the missile can cover almost all of Israel's territory.

   There is also a modified missile based on Fateh-110 design which was publicly unveiled on 9 February 2020. The Ra’ad 500 (Thunder 500) is claimed to be the fastest, lightest and cheapest version of the family. The missile is made of composite materials from top to the bottom and uses a Zahir engine, which is also the first Iranian engine made of composite materials.

   After the success of Fateh-110, Iran began to development of another solid-fuel missile, based on it. This led to the creation of the 2nd generation of this missile. The Fateh-313 was the first missile in the 2nd generation. It was first unveiled in 2015. It was an upgraded version of the Fateh-110. It had a detachable warhead and could reach targets at a range of 500 km range.

 

Missile Entered service Length Diameter Weight Warhead CEP Range
Fateh-110A 2002 9 m 0.61 m 3 700 kg 450 kg 250 m 250 km
Fateh-110B 2004 9 m 0.61 m ~ 3 700 kg ~ 450 kg 100 m 300 km
Khalij-e Fars 2008 9 m 0.61 m ~ 3 500 kg ~ 600 kg 5-8 m 300 km
Fateh-110C 2010 9 m 0.61 m ~ 3 700 kg ~ 450 kg 10 m 300 km
Hormuz 2011 9 m 0.61 m ~ 3 400 kg ~ 500 kg ~ 5 m 300 km
Fateh-110D 2012 9 m 0.61 m ~ 3 400 kg 450 kg 10 m 300 km
Fateh Mobin 2015 9 m 0.61 m ~ 3 400 kg ~ 450 kg 5 m 300 km
Ra'ad 500 2020 8.5 m 0.61 m 1 800 kg ~ 500 kg 5 m 500 km

 

Enshan Ostadrahimi

   Article by EHSAN OSTADRAHIMI

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Fateh-110 ballistic missile

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Fateh-110 ballistic missile

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Fateh-110 ballistic missile

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Fateh-110 ballistic missile

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Fateh-110 ballistic missile

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Fateh-110 ballistic missile

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Fateh-110 ballistic missile

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Fateh-110 ballistic missile

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