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Fagot

Anti-tank guided missile

Fagot anti-tank missile

The Fagot was the first Soviet second-generation anti-tank guided missile

 
 
Country of origin Soviet Union
Entered service 1970
Missile
Armor penetration 400 mm
Missile length (with launch tube) 1 098 mm
Missile diameter 120 mm
Fin span ?
Missile weight (with launch tube) 13 kg
Total weight with launcher 35.5 kg
Warhead weight ~ 1.75 kg
Warhead type HEAT
Range of fire 2 km
Guidance Wire-guided

 

   The 9K111 Fagot (Bassoon) is a Soviet Anti-Tank Guided Missile (ATGM). Its development program was launched in 1966. It was the first Soviet second-generation ATGM. The Fagot had some features of a Franco-German MILAN, though it was a different weapon. The Fagot was adopted by the Soviet Army in 1970. It was produced in large numbers and was widely exported to Soviet allies. This weapon was designated in the West as AT-4 or Spigot.

   The Fagot marked a departure from the previous Soviet anti-tank missiles like the Malyutka (Western reporting name AT-3 Sagger) and the older Fleyta (AT-2 Swatter). It was a wire-guided Semi-Automatic Command to Line of Sight (SACLOS) ATGMs. Its semi-automatic guidance system was much more accurate than of the previous Soviet ATGMs. The operator just have to keep a crosshair on the target, while the guidance system guides the missile on the target automatically. The Fagot has a hit probability of 80-90%, opposed to 50-60% of the previous Soviet ATGMs. Together with its other features the Fagot was incomparable to anything in the West, such as American BGM-71 TOW or the Franco-German MILAN and had little in common with its peers.

   The baseline 9M111 missile is factory-fitted and sealed in launch tube. It has a range of 2 000 m. The missile is fitted with High Explosive Anti-Tank (HEAT) warhead and penetrates 400 mm of steel armor. Though penetration is reduced to 200 mm once the missile hits the target under 60° angle. Such result was not impressive and soon improved missiles, as well as improved variants of the Fagot appeared.

   When launched the missile spins toward the target and emits a red tail light so its course can be followed visually. Maximum rate of fire is 3 missiles per minute.

   The missile is mounted on a 9P135 tripod-launcher system. It combines a collapsible launcher unit on tripod with an integrated guidance unit/controller box and firing mechanism. The launcher of the Fagot allowed its deployment in a concealed position or behind cover. Unlike the BGM-71 TOW, for example, the Fagot could be launched without the operators exposing themselves. In travelling order the launcher unit can be split into several parts. The operators carry a total of 8 missiles.

 

Variants

 

   9M111-2 (Western reporting name AT-4B or Spigot B) is an improved missile with a tandem HEAT warhead. It penetrates up to 460 mm or steel armor behind explosive reactive armor.

   9K111M Fagot-M (Western reporting name AT-4C or Spigot C) is a further improved version with a longer range. The launcher unit is fitted with thermal sight and can be used at night. The improved 9M111M missile has a range of 2 500 m. Its HEAT warhead penetrates 460-500 mm of steel armor. Though penetration is reduced to 230 mm once the missile hits the target under 60° angle. The improved missile is slightly heavier. Together with launch tube it weights 13.2 kg. Its warhead weights 1.75 kg.

   Konkurs (Western reporting name AT-5 Spandrel). It is a larger and deadlier variant of Fagot, mainly intended to be used on vehicles, though it can be also used by the infantry and launched from a tripod-launcher. The Konkurs uses a larger 135 mm missile and has a range of up to 4 km. The baseline HEAT missile penetrates 600-670 mm of steel armor. The Konkurs missiles use the same launcher unit of the Fagot. The Konkurs was adopted in 1974 and was produced in large numbers. It was widely exported to Soviet allies. Due to its close resemblance to the Fagot, it wasn’t until 1977 that Western intelligence managed to identify the new ATGM and differentiate it. The Konkurs was widely used on BMP-2 infantry fighting vehicles, BRDM-2 armored reconnaissance vehicles, and BMD-2 airborne combat vehicles.

   Yugoslavian license-produced version.

   SAMHO or Semi-Active Mission Homing is an Indian anti-tank guided missile. This 120 mm missile is packed in a launch tube, which strongly resembles that of the Fagot and uses externally similar launcher unit. However the Indian missile has different appearance and uses laser guidance instead of wire guidance. It is proposed with tandem HEAT and High-Explosive Fragmentation (HE-FRAG) warheads. The SAMHO has a range of up to 5 km.

   Bulsae-2 is a North Korean indigenous version of the Fagot with similar launch tube and launcher unit. It has different sights and possibly uses laser guidance.

 

 

Fagot anti-tank missile

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Fagot anti-tank missile

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Fagot anti-tank missile

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Fagot anti-tank missile

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Fagot anti-tank missile

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Fagot anti-tank missile

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