Home > Helicopters > Westland Sea King

Westland Sea King

Anti-submarine warfare and utility helicopter

Westland Sea King

The Westland Sea King is a license-produced version of the Sikorsky S-61

 
 
Entered service 1970
Crew 2 - 4 men
Dimensions and weight
Length 17 m
Main rotor diameter 18.9 m
Height 5.13 m
Weight (empty) 6.39 t
Weight (maximum take off) 9.7 t
Engines and performance
Engines 2 x Rolls-Royce Gnome H1400 turboshafts
Engine power 2 x 1 400 shp
Maximum speed 208 km/h
Cruising speed ?
Service ceiling ?
Range 1 230 km
Ferry range ?
Armament
Machine guns provision for door-mounted machine guns
Torpedoes 4 x Mk.44, Mk.46 or Stingray torpedoes
Other 4 x depth charges instead of torpedoes

 

   The Westland Sea King is a license produced version of the Sikorsky S-61. In 1961 the Sikorsky S-61 has been adopted by the US Navy as the H-3 Sea King. Westland Helicopters acquired rights to produce this helicopter in the United Kingdom.  The Westland Sea King first flew in 1969 and was adopted by the Royal Navy in 1970. It was also used by Royal Air Force for search and rescue operations. Westland built around 340 Sea Kings for the anti-submarine warfare, airborne early warning and assault transport roles. This helicopter has been exported to a number of countries, including Australia, Belgium, Egypt, Germany, India, Norway, Pakistan and Qatar. Westland built the last Sea King in 1997. Australian Navy retired these helicopters, however Sea Kings are still in service with all other operators.

   Even though the Westland Sea King is a license produced version of the Sikorsky S-61, it was fitted with British avionics and carried different ASW equipment than its American counterpart.

   The helicopter has a watertight boat-like hull. It has pontoons with floating bags, that give the Sea King a capability to land on water.

   The Westland Sea King has a crew of 2 to 4, depending on the mission.

   The Westland Sea King is powered by two Rolls-Royce Gnome H1400 turboshaft engines, developing 1 400 shp each. It is a license-produced version of the General Electric T58. The Sea King HAS.5 was powered by more powerful H1400-2 turboshafts, developing 1 660 shp each.

   Some versions of this helicopter can carry various loads underslung.

   The Westland Sea King can carry four Mk.44, Mk.46 or Stingray torpedoes, or four depth charges. Export versions can carry Sea Eagle or Exocet missiles for anti-shipping duties. Also this helicopter has provision for various door-mounted machine guns.

   This naval helicopter has a moveable tail section. For storage below carrier decks the tail and the main rotor blades are folded.

   There are numerous versions and upgrades of the Westland Sea King. In the mid 1980s Westland teamed with Augusta of Italy to develop the successor of the Sea King. It eventually became the AugustaWestland AW101, also known as the Merlin.

 

Variants

 

   Sea King HAS.1 a baseline anti-submarine warfare version of the Royal Navy, fitted with a dipping sonar and search radar. It first flew in 1969 and was adopted by the Royal Navy in 1970. This ASW helicopter is normally flown with a crew of four. A total of 56 of these helicopters were built. Later many of which were converted to improved HAS.2 version;

   Sea King HAS.2 upgraded anti-submarine version of the Royal Navy. It is based on Australian Sea King Mk.50. This helicopter is fitted with more powerful Rolls-Royce Gnome H1400-1 engines, developing 1 535 shp each. It also has a 6-bladed tail rotor, upgraded avionics, improved navigation and communication equipment, new dipping sonar. A total of 21 of these helicopters were newly built, plus many were converted from the older HAS.1 version. Later some of the HAS.2 helicopters were converted to AEW.2 standard for airborne early warning duties;

   Sea King AEW.2 an airborne early warning version, used by the Royal Navy. A total of 9 helicopters were converted from the Sea King HAS.1 after lack of airborne early warning cover was revealed during Falklands War. This helicopter was fitted with Searchwater radar and the sonar was removed. This helicopter was normally flown with a crew of three, including pilot and two observers;

   Sea King HAR.3, a search and rescue variant, operated by the Royal Air Force. This helicopter carries extra fuel and has additional observation windows. A total of 19 of these helicopters were built;

   Sea King HAR.3A, improved version of the HAR.3, used for search and rescue. It was operated by the Royal Air Force. This helicopter was fitted with upgraded avionics. A total of 6 of these helicopters were built;

   Sea King HC.4, also known as Westland Commando. It is an assault transport helicopter, used by Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm. This chopper has a lengthened cabin and simplified undercarriage. It can carry 28 troops. A total of 42 of these helicopters were built. It has been used intensively in support of UK operations in former Yugoslavia;

   Sea King HAS.5, upgraded anti-submarine warfare variant, used by the Royal Navy. It was fitted with more powerful Rolls-Royce Gnome H1400-2 engines, developing 1 660 shp each. This helicopter had improved ASW equipment and had provision to use sonobuoys. It was adopted in 1981. A total of 30 Sea King HAS.5s were newly built, plus about 55 converted from the earlier versions;

   Sea King HAR.5 search and rescue version, used by the Royal Air Force. It was a conversion of the Sea King HAS.5 anti-submarine warfare version by removing ASW equipment. However this helicopter retains a search radar;

   Sea King AEW.5 airborne early warning version used by the Royal Navy. A total of 4 Sea King HAS.5s ASW helicopters were converted to this standard;

   Sea King HU.5 utility helicopter, used by the Royal Navy. These were converted from surplus HAS.5 ASW helicopters;

   Sea King HAS.6, anti-submarine warfare version, used by the Royal Navy. It was fitted win new avionics. A total of 5 were newly built, plus some were converted from the previous versions. This helicopter embarked on all three Invincible class light aircraft carriers;

   Sea King HAS.6 (CR), utility version used by the Royal Navy. Five of these were converted from HAS.6 ASW version. The last of these utility helicopters was retired in 2010;

   Sea King AEW7, airborne early warning helicopter. It is a conversion form earlier Sea King AEW.2 and AEW.5 helicopters, fitted with Searchwater 2000 radar;

 

Export variants

 

   Sea King Mk.41 is a search and rescue version of the HAS.1, used by the German Navy. It has a longer cabin. A total of 23 helicopters were delivered between 1973 and 1975. From 1986 a total of 20 of these helicopters were upgraded and fitted with additional nose radar and could carry Sea Skua anti-ship missiles;

   Sea King Mk.42, anti-submarine warfare version of the Sea King HAS.1 for the Indian Navy. A total of 12 helicopters were built;

   Sea King Mk.42A, anti-submarine warfare version of the Sea King HAS.2 for the Indian Navy. Only 3 were built;

   Sea King Mk.42B, multi-purpose anti-submarine warfare and anti-ship version of the Indian Navy. It was equipped with dipping sonar and could carry 2 Sea Eagle missiles. A total of 20 helicopters were delivered;

   Sea King Mk.42C, search and rescue and utility transport version for the Indian Navy. 6 were built;

   Sea King Mk.43, search and rescue version of the Sea King HAS.1 for the Royal Norwegian Air Force. This helicopter has a longer cabin. A total of 10 machines were built;

   Sea King Mk.43A, uprated Royal Norwegian Air Force version. Only one helicopter was built;

   Sea King Mk.43B, upgraded Royal Norwegian Air Force version. It had upgraded avionics, improved search radar, plus weather radar and FLIR turret. A total of 3 helicopters were newly built and all remaining Norwegian Mk.43 and Mk.43A were upgraded to this standard;

   Sea King Mk.45, anti-submarine warfare version of the Sea King HAS.1 for the Pakistan Navy. This helicopter had provision to carry Exocet anti-ship missiles. A total of 6 were built;

   Sea King Mk.47, anti-submarine warfare version of the Sea King HAS.2 for the Egyptian Navy. A total of 6 were built;

   Sea King Mk.48, search and rescue version, based on the Sea King HAS.2 for the Belgian Air Force. It had extended cabin. A total of five were built. These helicopters were delivered in 1976;

   Sea King Mk.50, multi-role version for the Royal Australian Navy. It is equivalent to Sea King HAS.2. A total of 10 were built;

   Sea King Mk.50A, improved multi-role version of the Royal Australian Navy. It was a follow-on order. Two helicopters were delivered in 1981;

   Sea King Mk.50B, upgraded multi-role version for the Royal Australian Navy;

   Commando Mk.1, assault and utility transport version for the Egyptian Air Force. It has a stretched cabin. This version retained a floatation gear. A total of fire were built;

   Commando Mk.2, improved assault and utility transport version for the Egyptian Air Force. It was fitted with more powerful engines. A total of 17 were built;

   Commando Mk.2A, assault and utility transport version of the Qatar Air Force. It is almost identical to Egyptian Mk.2. A total of 3 were built;

   Commando Mk.2B, VIP transport version for the Egyptian Air Force. A total of 2 were built;

   Commando Mk.2C, VIP transport version for the Qatar Air Force. Only one was built;

   Commando Mk.2E, electronic warfare version for the Egyptian Air Force. A total of 4 were built;

   Commando Mk.3 anti-ship version for the Qatar Air Force. It could carry 2 Exocet missiles. A total of 8 were built.

 

Video of the Westland Sea King anti-submarine warfare helicopter

 
Westland Sea King

Westland Sea King

Westland Sea King

Westland Sea King

Westland Sea King


 
Westland Sea King

Westland Sea King

Westland Sea King

Westland Sea King

Westland Sea King

Westland Sea King

Westland Sea King

Westland Sea King

Westland Sea King

Westland Sea King

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Home  Home     Aircraft     Helicopters     Tanks     Armored Vehicles     Artillery     Trucks     Engineering Vehicles     Missiles     Naval Forces     Firearms     |     Contact Us
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARG 2006 - 2017
 www.Military-Today.com Westland Sea King