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Kamov Ka-25

Anti-submarine warfare helicopter

Kamov Ka-25

The Kamov Ka-25 besides its main ASW role had a secondary ship-to-shore transport role

 
 
Ka-25BSh 'Hormone-A'
Country of origin Sovuet Union
Entered service 1967
Crew ?
Dimensions and weight
Length 9.75 m
Rotor diameter 15.74 m
Height 5.37 m
Weight (empty) 4.76 t
Weight (maximum take off) 7.5 t
Engines and performance
Engines 2 x OMKB 'Mars' GTD-3F turboshafts
Engine power 2 x 898 hp
Maximum speed 209 km/h
Service ceiling 3.3 km
Range 400 km
Armament
Torpedoes provision for torpedoes
Other free-fall bombs, conventional or nuclear depth charges

 

   Designed to meet a 1957 Soviet navy requirement for a new shipborne Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) helicopter, the first member of the Ka-20/25 family was the Ka-20 Harp, which initially flew during 1960. The production Ka-25BSh Hormone-A was of near identical size and appearance, but was fitted with operational equipment and uprated GTD-3F turboshaft engines (from 1973 these were replaced by GTD-3BMs). It entered service with the Soviet navy in 1967.

   It was the first Soviet helicopter, developed specially for maritime use. Its coaxial design with lack of a tail rotor gave the helicopter smaller dimensions and reduced footprint on ships.

   Although the lower part of the fuselage was sealed and watertight, the Ka-25 was not intended for amphibious operations, and flotation bags were often fitted to the undercarriage for use in the event of a emergency landing on the water. The cabin was adequate for the job, but was not tall enough to allow the crew to stand upright. Progressive additions of new equipment made the interior more cluttered.

   Primary sensors for the anti-submarine warfare mission were the I/J-band radar (ASCC/NATO Big Bulge), OKA-2 dipping sonar, a downward-looking Tie Rod electro-optical sensor in the tailboom and a Magnetic Anomaly Detection (MAD) sensor, either in a recess in the rear part of the cabin or in a fairing sometimes fitted below the central of the three tailfins. A box-like sonobuoy launcher could also be scabbed on to the starboard side of the rear fuselage. Dye-markers or smoke floats could also be carried externally. Comprehensive avionics, defensive and navigation systems were also fitted as standard.

   Armament was not normally carried, although the helicopter could be fitted with a long coffin-like weapons bay along the belly from the radome back to the tailboom. Small bombs or depth charges could be carried on tiny pylons just aft of the nosewheels. The underfuselage bay could carry a variety of weapons, including nuclear depth charges. When wire-guided torpedoes were carried, a wire reel was mounted on the port side of the forward fuselage.

   It has been estimated that some 260 of the 450 or so Ka-25s produced were Hormone-As. After collapse of the Soviet Union a number of helicopters were passed on to Ukrainian Navy. By 2010 only a handful remained in Russian and Ukrainian service, mostly fulfilling secondary roles. Small numbers of Ka-25BShs have been exported to Bulgaria, India, Syria, Vietnam and former Yugoslavia. These ASW helicopters were replaced by the newer Ka-27 and its export version, the Ka-28.

   The second Ka-25 variant identified in the West was given the NATO reporting name Hormone-B, is designated Ka-25K. This variant is externally identifiable by its bulbous (instead of flat-bottomed) undernose radome and small datalink radome under the rear fuselage. Ka-25K was used for acquiring targets and providing mid-course missile guidance, for ship- and submarine-launched missiles. On the Hormone-B only, the four undercarriage units are retractable and can be lifted out of the scanning pattern of the radar.

   The final version of the military Ka-25 was the Ka-25PS. It is a dedicated Search and Rescue (SAR) and transport helicopter. Its NATO reporting name is Hormone-C. The Ka-25PS can carry a practical load of freight or up to 12 passengers. It was a useful ship-to-ship or ship-to-shore transport and VERTREP platform. A quadruple Yagi antenna (Home Guard) was fitted to many helicopters. It was reportedly used for homing on to the personal locator beacons carried by aircrew. Most Ka-25PSs also had searchlight, and a 300-kg capacity rescue winch. Ka-25PS has largely been replaced by Ka-27PS.

   It seems that as of 2016 the Ka-25 is no longer used.

 

Video of the Ka-25 Hormone utility helicopter

 
Kamov Ka-25

Kamov Ka-25

Kamov Ka-25

Kamov Ka-25

Kamov Ka-25K


 
Kamov Ka-25K

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ARG 2006 - 2016
 www.Military-Today.com Kamov Ka-25 Hormone