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CEBARV

Beach armored recovery vehicle

CEBARV

The CEBARV is certainly among the most unusual elements in the British arsenal

 
 
Country of origin United Kingdom
Entered service 1960
Crew 4 men
Dimensions and weight
Weight 40 t
Length 8 m
Width 3.4 m
Height 3.45 m
Performance
Towed load ~ 40 t
Armament
Machine guns -
Mobility
Engine Meteor Mk.6 petrol
Engine power 650 hp
Maximum road speed 33 km/h
Range 400 km
Maneuverability
Gradient 60%
Fording 2.9 m

 

   CEBARV, the Centurion Beach Armored Recovery Vehicle, was the only recovery vehicle in service in the United Kingdom in the amphibious role. It was developed from the Centurion main battle tank with a prefabricated turret to enable it to ford up to depths of 2.9 m. Small scale production commenced in 1960 and a total of 12 of these recovery vehicles were built. These were based on Centurion Mk.3 chassis. These beach recovery vehicles were retired from the British military some time ago. In 2003 a replacement for the CEBARV was introduced. It was a Hippo, developed under the Future Beach Recovery Vehicle (FBRV) programme for the UK's Royal Marines. Prime contractor was Hagglunds Moelv of Norway. The beach recovery vehicles are certainly among the most unusual elements in the British arsenal.

   The main tasks of the CEBARV were to recover drowned or broken vehicles. It can pull vehicles with a maximum weight of around 40 t. This armored vehicle was also designed to push landing craft off the beached. For this role the CEBARV used its built-in special nose block. Another role of the CEBARV was to provide a breakwater for small craft and men operating in the water.

   Superstructure of the CEBARV is armored and provides protection for the crew. This recovery vehicle carries no defensive armament.

   This vehicle was powered by a Meteor Mk.6 petrol engine, developing 650 hp. Even though the engine remains unchanged, the gearing of the Centurion's transmission had been lowered in order to increase tractate force. However due to these changes maximum road speed reached only 33 km/h. Tracks of the CEBARV were actually reversed in order to provide better grip while backing-out of the water. Air intakes have been raised.

   This beach recovery vehicle was operated by a crew of 4, including 2 engineers and a diver.

   The current British Hippo beach armored recovery vehicle is based on a German Leopard 1A5 main battle tank chassis, specially modified for the beach recovery mission. It was developed under the Future Beach Recovery Vehicle (FBRV) programme to replace the CEBARV. Prime contractor was Hagglunds Moelv of Norway. The Hippo was adopted in 2003. Only 4 of these beach recovery vehicles are in service with the Royal Marines. The Hippo is used for the same roles including unbeaching, unbroaching and anchoring of landing craft as well as the recovery of drowned vehicles. In addition, it provides a lee for recovery and diving operations.

   Another operator of beach recovery vehicles is a Dutch military. It operates a small number of Bulldog beach recovery vehicles.

 

 

 
CEBARV

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CEBARV

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CEBARV

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CEBARV

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CEBARV

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CEBARV

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