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Stryker+Tr

Prototype armored personnel carrier

Stryker+Tr

The Stryker+Tr is aimed to replace the M113 family of tracked armored vehicles

 
 
Entered service ?
Crew 2 men
Personnel ~ 9 men
Dimensions and weight
Weight 38 t
Length ~ 7 m
Width ~ 2.7 m
Height ~ 2.5 m
Armament
Machine guns 1 x 12.7-mm
Mobility
Engine diesel
Engine power 675 hp
Maximum road speed ~ 70 km/h
Range ~ 550 km
Maneuverability
Gradient 60%
Side slope 30%
Vertical step ~ 0.6 m
Trench ~ 2 m
Fording ~ 1.2 m

 

   The tracked version of the Stryker wheeled armored personnel carrier, or Stryker+Tr, was developed by General Dynamics Land Systems. It is a tracked version of the M1126 Stryker infantry carrier vehicle. The new APC was aimed at the US Army's AMPV requirement to replace the venerable M113 family of tracked armored vehicles.

   A concept vehicle was revealed in 2012. It competed against a turretless Bradley, submitted by BAE Systems and modified MaxxPro, developed by Navistar Defense. However later General Dynamics announced that it would not compete for the US Army Armored Multi-Purpose Vehicle programme. In 2014 the turretless version of the Bradley was selected as a winner and the BAE Systems was awarded with production contract. So the future of the Stryker+Tr is uncertain. It seems that development of this vehicle stopped.

   The tracked Stryker weights 38 t. It is significantly heavier than its wheeled predecessor. As even the fully up-weighted wheeled version weighs 24.5 t.

   Basic armor of the tracked Stryker APC provides all-round protection against 7.62-mm NATO ball rounds. A ceramic add-on armor can be fitted for protection against 14.5-mm heavy machine gun rounds. This armored personnel carrier can be also fitted with slat armor or explosive reactive armor for protection against RPG rounds. Interior of the vehicle is lined with Kevlar liner which protects the occupants from spalling. The Stryker+Tr has a double V-shaped hull for better protection against landmines and IED blasts. Fuel tanks are mounted externally and are designed to blow away from the hull in the event of explosion. This armored personnel carrier has an automatic fire-suppression and NBC protection systems.

   The concept vehicle is fitted with a remotely-controlled weapon station, armed with a single 12.7-mm machine gun. Alternatively it can be armed with 40-mm automatic grenade launcher.

   The Stryker+Tr is equipped with a battlefield information management system. This system links up with other similarly equipped vehicles and command posts. This APC is also fitted with a GPS receiver for positioning and navigation.

   This vehicle has a crew of two, including commander and driver. It can carry about 9 fully equipped troops. Troops enter and leave the vehicle through the rear ramp or roof hatches.

   The tracked Stryker is significantly heavier. So the new vehicle fitted with a much more powerful turbocharged diesel engine, developing 675 hp. The new tracked armored personnel carrier has improved cross-country mobility over its wheeled predecessor. The Stryker+Tr can be airlifted by the C-130, C-141, C-5 and C-17 transport aircraft. It can be deployed anywhere in the world within 96 hours.

   Originally a whole host of variant of the tracked Stryker were planned.

 

 
Stryker+Tr

Stryker+Tr

Stryker+Tr

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