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Cougar

Mine resistant ambush protected vehicle

Cougar MRAP

In 2004 the USMC reported that no troops have died in more than 300 IED attacks on Cougars

 
 
Cougar 6x6
Entered service 2002
Crew 2 men
Personnel 8 men
Dimensions and weight
Weight 23.6 t
Length 7 m
Width 2.6 m
Height 2.64 m
Mobility
Engine Caterpillar C7 diesel
Engine power 330 hp
Maximum road speed over 105 km/h
Range 670 km
Maneuverability
Gradient 60%
Side slope 30%
Vertical step ~ 0.5 m
Trench ~ 0.5 m
Fording 1 m

 

   The Cougar is a mine resistant ambush protected vehicle, developed by Force Protection Inc. It is available in 4x4 and 6x6 configurations. Vehicle is produced since 2002. Several thousands of these vehicles are in service with the US Armed Forces. Other operators of the Cougar MRAP and its variants are Canada, Iraq, Italy, Poland and the United Kingdom.

   The British Army has operated an early version of the Cougar as the Tempest MPV. The Cougar MRAP won competition against the RG-33 in the UK.

   The Cougar MRAP provides protection against direct fire, mines, IEDs and RPG rounds. The 4x4 variant is a Category 1 and 6x6 variant - Category 2 vehicle. The Cougar MRAP has a V-shaped hull, that extends to the engine bay. Such design is intended to direct the blast away from the vehicle. All-round protection is against 7.62-mm NATO rounds, however significant ballistic upgrades are available, upon 12.7-mm armor-piercing rounds. NBC protection system is offered as an option. It is worth mentioning that in 2004 US Marine Corps reported that no troops had died in more than 300 IED attacks on Cougars.

   These mine resistant vehicles are armed with roof mounted 7.62-mm machine guns. The Cougar MRAP can be also fitted with remotely controlled weapon station. Both 4x4 and 6x6 variants are fitted with two side, one rear door and roof hatch. Some vehicles are provided with firing ports for the occupants.

   Both 4x4 and 6x6 variants are powered by the same Caterpillar C7 diesel engine, developing 330 hp. Vehicles are fitted with run-flat tyres. The Cougar MRAP can be airlifted by the C-17 transport aircraft.

 

Variants

 

   Cougar JERRV (Joint EOD rapid response vehicle), this explosive ordnance disposal vehicle is available in both 4x4 and 6x6 configurations;

   Cougar HEV (Hardened Engineer Vehicle), available in 4x4 and 6x6 configurations. This variant was ordered in 2004 by the US Marine Corps;

   Badger MRAP, based on the Cougar. It is in service with the New Iraqi Army;

   Ridgback, British version of the Cougar 4x4, fitted with larger armor plates, which covers vision blocks and firing ports. This vehicle is also fitted with British electronics;

   Mastiff, British version of the Cougar 6x6, fitted with larger armor plates, which covers vision blocks and firing ports. This vehicle is also fitted with British electronics;

   Wolfhound, British version of the Cougar 6x6, similar to Mastiff, fitted with a rear loading area to carry essential combat supplies, such as ammunition, in forward operation areas;

   Timberwolf, version specially designed to meet Canadian Army requirement for a wheeled protected reconnaissance, surveillance, command and control vehicle.

 

Video of the Cougar mine resistant ambush protected vehicle

 

 
Cougar MRAP

Cougar MRAP

Cougar MRAP

Cougar MRAP

Cougar MRAP

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