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Boeing C-17 Globemaster III

Heavy transport aircraft

Boeing C-17 Globemaster III

Currently the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III is operated by the United States and Royal Air Forces

 
 
Entered service 1993
Crew 3 men
Dimensions and weight
Length 53.04 m
Wing span 51.76 m
Height 16.79 m
Weight (empty) 125.6 t
Weight (maximum take off) 265.3 t
Engines and performance
Engines 4 x Pratt & Whitney F117-PW-100 turbofans
Traction 4 x 181.04 kN
Maximum speed 816 km/h
Service ceiling 10.9 km
Ferry range 8 704 km
Range (with typical payload) 4 445 km
Payload
Maximum payload 76.6 t
Typical load 102 troops/paratroops on stowable seats in the cabin, 48 litters, three AH-64 Apache helicopters or air-droppable platforms up to a weight of 49.8 t

 

   On 29 August 1981 McDonnell Douglas (since 1997 incorporated into Boeing) was selected to proceed with a design to fulfil the USAF's C-X requirement for a new heavy cargo transport. Although the aircraft reached initial operational capability only in January 1995, it is now revitalizing the USA's strategic airlift capability.

   The winning design was designated C-17A, and lalter received the name Globemaster III. Retaining the now-classic military transport aircraft configuration, the C-17 also incorporates advanced-technology features such as winglets, a supercritical wing section and high-performance turbofans with thrust reversers.

   The C-17 can routinely operate from airfields previously denied to jet-powered transports. The cockpit is state-of-the-art, with four multi-function displays, and a head-up display for each pilot. Flight control is effected by a fly-by-wire system, and the pilots each have a control column rather than the conventional yoke.

   After an earlier full-scale development schedule had been abandoned, the single prototype of the C-17A made its maiden flight on 15 September 1991. Deliveries to the 17th Airlift Squadron at Charleston AFB, SOuth Carolina, began in June 1993. Continued opposition to the C-17 reduced procurement from 210 aircraft to 120 by 1991, and subsequently to an even lower minimum of 40 aircraft. The controlling and radical reduction of production costs and the manifest capabilities of the type then saw the previous total of 120 reinstated for delivery by 2005. A further 15 have been added later for the support of the US Special Forces, and the prospect of another 45 standard airlifters for the USAF was under possible consideration. In addition, the Royal Air Force's No.99 started operating four leased C-17As in 2001. Other operators are Kuwait (2) Qatar (4), and United Arab Emirates (6).

 

Video of the Boeing C-17 Globemaster III transport aircraft

 
Boeing C-17 Globemaster III

Boeing C-17 Globemaster III

Boeing C-17 Globemaster III

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